Our Price: $39,500

RARE CONFEDERATE DANCE DRAGOON REVOLVER HIGHEST SERIAL NUMBER KNOWN OF COMPLETE AND FUNCTIONAL REVOLVER FOUND IN COLUMBIA, TEXAS AT THE DANCE FACTORY LOCATION NEAR WAR’S END

Serial Number 332. Caliber 44. This gun has an intriguing history descending in the family of a WWII ace who told his son stories of this gun being found at the factory site at war's end. serial number “332” is found on barrel, loading assembly, frame, cylinder and hammer. The gun has recently been restored to functional condition by excellent antique firearm gunsmith (receipt and old grips accompany gun). All major parts are original with exception of grips. The triggerguard is unserialized but appears original after close scrutiny by restorer. He notes that every screw appears original. This gun was in fire, most likely at factory site and salvaged shortly thereafter. The melted brass triggerguard replaced by an unfinished one also from dance factory site.

Ironically, the trigger guard is virtually identical to an unfinished excavated example pictured on pg 135 of Gary Wiggins text Dance & Brothers Texas Gun Makers to the Confederacy and very similar  to that unserialized one on serial number 164 that was sold from Bill Gary collection in June 2014 for world record price of $261,800.00. The iron backstrap, which has no serial number, also has same burned appearance of other original iron parts is indeed original and only a few Dances are known with this feature (SNs 247, 317 & 333). SN “333” (consecutive serial number) which was excavated near East Columbia, Texas with portions of its original iron backstrap is pictured on pg 125 of Wiggins text.

This gun has been retained in the Forster family and was remembered by the son in the 1950’s along with the accompanying side knife which is well made, utilizing an eagle head sword hilt, transformed into a great Bowie knife with 9-3/4″ blade, 2-1/2″ clip point, about-1-1/2″ wide. The scabbard is made from reused leather and appears mounted in later style for continued use . As you will see in accompanying affidavit from Mr. Forster, his father told him this knife had “killed Yankees”, regardless, it is a well made side knife and there are other Civil War era side knives known that were reused by GI’s in the 20th Century. Accompanied by affidavit from owner.

As noted, gun is functional with iron showing old fire scale and areas where melted brass trigger guard discolored areas, especially on backstrap and left side of frame.

Screws appear original and metal surfaces have been cleaned and filed during restoration. Cones and safety pins as noted are replaced. Mechanically gun functions with well discerned rifling in bore. Accompanying side knife is very good as found, pommel is slightly loose. Top of bone grip is chipped. Remnants of gilt found on brass mounts. Blade is grey overall with old sharpening, staining and light pitting. The scabbard is sound, solid, fits knife well with crack in leather near tip of sewn piece. All in all, this is a very intriguing grouping with a wonderful side knife along with the highest serial number in complete functioning condition of Dance revolver known. If this gun could only talk!